NEW YORK RUNNERS DID MORE THAN JUST RUN
Proud to be a Runner!
You would think that I was living in NYC and was directly effected by Hurricane Sandy.  I was amazed at the power of the hurricane and I felt deeply for the victims.  Throughout the week and weekend I have been following Hurricane Sandy news SO CLOSELY.  I have also been following the news on whether or not NYC marathon would be cancelled or not.  I was shocked to hear that, AT FIRST it was going to move forward but later found out that it was cancelled and the runners who had traveled to NYC to run decided to help volunteer.  Here is the article that I read this weekend that just brought joy to my heart.  You have to remember that giving is so much more than just receiving and NYC runner's. . .you made many of us proud nationwide!

A Staten Island Run For Relief

At every marathon, you eventually hit a physical and mental low point. The Wall. The Bonk. The place where the piano climbs on your back. In our New York City substitute marathon this morning, my friends and I hit the Wall at 3 miles.
Orange-clad runners gather Sunday morning at the Staten Island Ferry Terminal in lower Manhattan. 

Photo by Robert Reese
We were running on Staten Island with a two-day-old group called “New York Runners in Support of Staten Island.” I had fallen in with one of the more modest “pace teams,” one intent on running just three to four miles to an emergency distribution point before we turned around and returned home. Others had set out for more distant parts: seven miles from the Staten Island Ferry terminal. All of us were carrying heavy bags and backpacks laden with supplies; we quickly learned that the topography was uphill for several miles from the ferry terminal on Staten Island.
The hills and extra weight fatigued us faster than we had imagined. Still, we were mostly still running up the final hill to Michael Petrides School, where we would disburse our goods. We had just passed under the Staten Island Freeway, and seen the sign that said “Verrazano Bridge, left.” The Verrazano is of course where the New York City Marathon had started every previous year since 1976.
Oops, a problem: There’s nothing going on at the school. One security guard, no FEMA or Red Cross or other emergency helpers. We were tired and lost on Staten Island, and still carrying our loads, me and the approximately 100 other runners in my group. We thought we had reached the finish line. Instead, we were in the middle of nowhere. Bonk!